NIV Application Commentary Series (NIVAC) | New Testament | Reviews, Purpose, and Volumes

Reviews of the NIV Application Commentary Series

“The NIV Application Commentary series promises to be of very great service to all who preach and teach the Word of God.”
~ J. I. Packer, Board of Governors’ Professor of Theology, Regent College

“This series promises to become an indispensable tool for every pastor and teacher who seeks to make the Bible’s timeless message speak to this generation.”
~ Billy Graham, American evangelist

“The NIV Application Commentary is an outstanding resource for pastors and anyone else who is serious about developing “doers of the Word.”
~ Rick Warren, pastor, Saddleback Valley Community Church

“If you want to avoid hanging applicational elephants from interpretive threads, then the NIV Application Commentary is for you! This series excels at both original meaning and contemporary significance. I support it one hundred percent.”
~ Howard G. Hendricks, professor, Dallas Theological Seminary

“The NIV Application Commentary meets the urgent need for an exhaustive and authoritative commentary based on the New International Version. This series will soon be found in libraries and studies throughout the evangelical community.”
~ D. James Kennedy, founder, Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church

“The NIV Application Commentary series helps pastors and other Bible teachers with one of the most neglected elements in good preaching—accurate, useful application. Most commentaries tell you a few things that are helpful and much that you do not need to know. By dealing with the original meaning and contemporary significance of each passage, the NIV Application Commentary series promises to be helpful all the way around.”
~ James Montgomery Boice, former pastor, Tenth Presbyterian Church

“Here, at last, is a commentary that makes the proper circuit from the biblical world to Main Street. The NIV Application Commentary is a magnificent gift to the church!”
~ R. Kent Hughes, senior pastor emeritus, College Church, Wheaton, IL

Purpose of the NIV Application Commentary Series

From the General Editor: “The primary goal of the NIV Application Commentary Series is to help you with the difficult but vital task of bringing an ancient message into a modern context. The series not only focuses on application as a finished product but also helps you think through the process of moving from the original meaning of a passage to its contemporary significance. These are commentaries, not popular expositions. They are works of reference, not devotional literature.”

Author Interviews from the NIV Application Commentary series on Best Bible Commentaries

Leviticus and Numbers – Roy Gane

Preview: “The whole writing project personally edified me and drew me closer to Christ, first as I saw the loving character of God reflected in the sacrifices foreshadowing the sacrifice of Christ and in the way he reached out to his people and interacted with them as close as he could get from his sanctuary residence among them.”

Hebrews – George Guthrie

Preview: “As I came to the climax of the christology in Hebrews, particularly 9:11-10:18, the decisiveness of Christ’s sacrifice for our sins really impressed me and has continued to be a cornerstone of my own faith.”

NIV Application Commentary – New Testament Volumes

Links go to Amazon. Text is from Zondervan (used by permission).

Matthew by Michael Wilkins

The importance of the Gospel of Matthew in church history cannot be overstated. For Jewish readers, it affirmed the Messiahship of Jesus, referring consistently to the Scriptures to establish his credentials. For Gentile disciples, it provided powerful and dramatic support of their inclusion in God’s kingdom. The cross of Christ had removed the division between Jew and non-Jew, and through Matthew’s writings, we see Israel’s God drawing the entire world to himself through Jesus. “The Gospel according to Matthew . . . Was the most widely read and frequently used of any of the four Gospels in the formative years of the church,” writes Michael Wilkins. In this volume of the NIV Application Commentary, Wilkins explains Matthew’s broad appeal not only to his ancient readers, but also to us today. Exploring the links between the Bible and our own times, Wilkins shares perspectives on Matthew’s Gospel that reveal its enduring relevance for our twenty-first-century lives.

Mark by David E. Garland

David E. Garland (PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is William B. Hinson Professor of Christian Scriptures and dean for academic affairs at George W. Truett Seminary, Baylor University. He is the New Testament editor for the revised Expositor’s Bible Commentary and the author of various books and commentaries, including Mark and Colossians/Philemon in the NIV Application Commentary, and the article on Mark in the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary. He and his wife, Diana, reside in Waco, Texas.

Luke by Darrell L. Bock

Darrell L. Bock (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is research professor of New Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary. Known for his work in Luke-Acts, Dr. Bock is a Humboldt Scholar (Tubingen University in Germany), an editor-at-large for Christianity Today, and a past president of the Evangelical Theological Society (2000-2001). A New York Times bestselling author, Bock has written over thirty books, including Luke in the NIV Application Commentary series.

John by Gary Burge

Gary M. Burge (PhD, King’s College, Aberdeen University) is visiting professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary. Gary has authored a number of books, including Who Are God’s People in the Middle East? What Christians Are Not Being Told About Israel and the Palestinians; John and Letters of John in the NIV Application Commentary series; The New Testament in Antiquity (coauthored with Gene Green); and the first three volumes in the Ancient Context, Ancient Faith series: The Bible and the Land, Jesus, the Middle Eastern Storyteller, and Encounters with Jesus. Gary specializes in the Middle East, its churches, and its history in the Hellenistic period.

Acts by Ajith Fernando

Ajith Fernando (ThM, DD) served for thirty-five years as the National Director of Youth for Christ in Sri Lanka and now serves as its Teaching Director. He is a Bible expositor with a worldwide ministry. Ajith studied at Asbury Theological Seminary and Fuller Seminary and spends much of his time mentoring and counseling Christian workers. He is a visiting lecturer at Colombo Theological Seminary.

Romans by Douglas J. Moo

Our culture does not encourage thoughtful reflection on truth. Yet living the gospel in a postmodern culture demands that Christians understand and internalize the truth about God and his plan for the world. Paul’s letter to the Romans remains one of the most important expressions of Christian truth ever written. Its message forces us to evaluate who we are, who God is, and what our place in this world ought to be. Going beyond the usual commentary, this volume brings the meaning of Paul’s great letter into the twenty-first century. Douglas Moo comments on the text and then explores issues in Paul’s culture and in ours that help us understand the ultimate meaning of each paragraph. A final section suggests ways in which the eternal theology of Romans can be understood and lived out in our modern culture.

1 Corinthians by Craig L. Blomberg

Craig L. Blomberg (PhD, Aberdeen) is distinguished professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary. He is the author, co-author, or co-editor of numerous books and more than 130 articles in journals or multi-author works. A recurring topic of interest in his writings is the historical reliability of the Scriptures. Craig and his wife Fran have two daughters and reside in Centennial, Colorado.

2 Corinthians by Scott J. Hafemann

Scott J. Hafemann, PhD, serves on the Gordon-Conwell faculty as the Mary French Rockefeller Professor of New Testament. Previously he was the Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis at Wheaton College.

Galatians by Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight (PhD, Nottingham) is the Julius R. Mantey Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, Illinois. He is the author of more than fifty books, including the award-winning The Jesus Creed as well as The King Jesus Gospel, A Fellowship of Differents, One.Life, The Blue Parakeet, and Kingdom Conspiracy.

Ephesians by Klyne Snodgrass

Klyne Snodgrass (PhD, University of St. Andrews) is professor of biblical literature and holder of the Paul W. Brandel Chair of New Testament Studies at North Park Theological Seminary.

Philippians by Frank S. Thielman

Frank Thielman (PhD, Duke University) is Presbyterian professor of divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Samford University, in Birmingham, Alabama. He is the author of Philippians in the NIV Application Commentary series.

Colossians, Philemon by David E. Garland

David E. Garland (PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is William B. Hinson Professor of Christian Scriptures and dean for academic affairs at George W. Truett Seminary, Baylor University. He is the New Testament editor for the revised Expositor’s Bible Commentary and the author of various books and commentaries, including Mark and Colossians/Philemon in the NIV Application Commentary, and the article on Mark in the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary. He and his wife, Diana, reside in Waco, Texas.

1 and 2 Thessalonians by Michael W. Holmes

Michael W. Holmes (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is professor of biblical studies and early Christianity at Bethel College in St. Paul, Minnesota.

1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, and Titus by Walter L. Liefeld

Walter L. Liefeld is distinguished professor emeritus of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and is the author of Luke in the Expositor’s Bible Commentary series.

Hebrews by George H. Guthrie

George H. Guthrie (PhD, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary) serves as the Benjamin W. Perry Professor of Bible at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee. As a specialist in New Testament and Greek, he is the author of numerous articles and four books including the volume Hebrews in the NIV Application Commentary series.

James by David P. Nystrom

Straight to the point, practical, affirming, convicting—that’s the book of James. In it, we see a picture of early Christians wrestling to apply the teachings of Jesus to their everyday lives. And we see a community plagued by divisiveness and hypocrisy, with an emphasis on wealth and status. James pulls no punches addressing these issues, calling for a faith that shows itself in moral actions: in speech, in interpersonal relationships, in economic and social justice. He also lays out a theology of the redemptive value of suffering. In our day when the behavior and attitudes of professed Christians are often not much different from the surrounding culture, in our society of great wealth, and in our culture that abhors suffering, the challenging message of James is greatly needed. Exploring the links between the Bible and our own times, David Nystrom shares perspectives on the book of James that reveal its enduring relevance for our twenty-first-century lives.

1 Peter by Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight (PhD, Nottingham) is the Julius R. Mantey Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, Illinois. He is the author of more than fifty books, including the award-winning The Jesus Creed as well as The King Jesus Gospel, A Fellowship of Differents, One.Life, The Blue Parakeet, and Kingdom Conspiracy.

2 Peter, Jude by Douglas J. Moo

The apostles Peter and Jude wouldn’t have made good postmodernists. They insist that there is such a thing as absolute, non-negotiable truth, as well as error and deception. They speak of false doctrines and those who teach them as if they actually believe that eternity hangs in the balance and that God, far from shrugging his shoulders like a good relativist, takes the matters of truth and spiritual authority very seriously. Today the fiery, unapologetic language of 2 Peter and Jude can open our eyes to stark spiritual realities. Like few other apostolic writings, these two letters shake us awake to the vital necessity of embracing the true gospel and transmitting it undistorted. The message is as countercultural as possible, and profoundly timely.

The Letters of John by Gary M. Burge

Gary M. Burge (PhD, King’s College, Aberdeen University) is visiting professor of New Testament at Calvin Theological Seminary. Gary has authored a number of books, including Who Are God’s People in the Middle East? What Christians Are Not Being Told About Israel and the Palestinians; John and Letters of John in the NIV Application Commentary series; The New Testament in Antiquity (coauthored with Gene Green); and the first three volumes in the Ancient Context, Ancient Faith series: The Bible and the Land, Jesus, the Middle Eastern Storyteller, and Encounters with Jesus. Gary specializes in the Middle East, its churches, and its history in the Hellenistic period.

Revelation by Craig S. Keener

Craig S. Keener is professor of New Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary and holds a doctoral degree in New Testament Studies and the Origins of Christianity from Duke University. He is the author of several commentaries on books of the New Testament.


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NIV Application Commentary | Old Testament | Reviews, Purpose, Volumes

Old Testament Commentaries index

New Testament Commentary index

Author interviews index